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Introduction

This wiki documents the ShapeOko, a low-cost, open source CNC mill designed by Edward Ford, the second version of which was announced on 21 October 2013,[1] a little over two years after the Kickstarter campaign for the previous version[2] and MakerSlide which was developed by Bart Dring[3]. Like many other 3D printers and small automation devices, it uses an Arduino as its microcontroller, this was developed by Hernando Barragan at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea in Ivrea, Italy and runs Grbl, an interpreter for G-code (a standard language for Computer Numerical Control (CNC)) originally written by Simen Svale Skogsrud (now developed by a small team at bengler.no).

Much information about the original machine is still present here and has been archived (see ShapeOko 1 Build Instructions in the sidebar) and these pages serve as a catch-all for anything not covered at Project ShapeOko (news and updates and main link repository), the Project Gallery, and docs.shapeoko.com (assembly instructions, with content hosted on github.com) and the user forums.

ShapeOko

An Open Hardware project in Dixon, IL by Edward Ford

Ayo! If you're looking at this project, you probably think a low cost simple desktop CNC machine is as cool as we do. Sweet. It's always nice to meet like minded people!

Have a look around the DIY CNC scene and you will notice the lack of simple, low cost, straight forward build options. We want to fix that. For the last four years we have been designing, redesigning, and building what we hope to be a CNC machine that anyone can build for about $300. Did I mention that cost even includes the electronics to run the machine? Unlike other projects where you're shelling out $1,000 for just the frame and maybe motors, ShapeOko includes everything you will need to turn your ideas from just a crazy thought into a tangible item.

If nothing else, this project is open. Nobody wants to get locked into some proprietary platform, and nobody wants to spend their money on a machine just to learn they will need to spend another $500 on software to run it. With that in mind, we built the entire process around open source components. From CAD and CAM software to the CNC controller; every step has an open source solution. Did we mention the entire project itself is open source? Every nut, every bolt, every belt, fully documented with part numbers and vendor list. Do with it as you please!

What makes this different? One of the frustrations we had with other designs was the fact that you had to visit a lot of different vendors in order to get all the pieces. We didn't like that. Plus, some projects didn't have a central "released" build, which made it difficult to determine if what you were building was actually what you were expecting to build.

All of that resulted in the following design goals:

  • 1 standard design
  • $300 total cost
  • Maximum of 3 vendors


So, how are we doing on the goals?

  • 1 standard design - So far, so good. There are documented upgrades, but still a single design.
  • $300 total cost - Pretty close. Plan to spend around $350 to get your ShapeOko running.
  • Maximum of 3 vendors - Well, as Meat Loaf said, two out of three ain't bad. See the Purchasing page for more info.

ShapeOko partially assembled.jpg

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