Quick alternative for setting Z-Zero after tool change

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Quick alternative for setting Z-Zero after tool change

Postby NickT » Fri Apr 14, 2017 9:11 pm

I do stress this is a "Quick" alternative in that it is not supper accurate, but for general use it has proved to be pretty good.

The idea is simple, after a tool change what needs to be set, or maintained, is the distance from the collet to the top of the next bit. So a quick and simple "U" frame as picture below fits the bill.
I didn't add an SVG file or anything as this is so simple to make. The inside width is 1 5/8 and the inside height is 2 1/8.

The first tool I use the paper method to set z-zero. To perform a tool change I then put the new bit in finger tight, but loose enough so it can move, then bring the jig up until hit hits the router. Tighten the collet by hand and then finally tighten it with the wrench.

Most cutters are in the 2" range and this works fine. If you switch to a short v-bit please make sure there is enough "meat" in the collet. You may need to adjust the size of the jig in order to accommodate using shorter bits.

Like I said this is a quick method and for rough work it's fine.

IMG_0446.JPG
IMG_0446.JPG (89.7 KiB) Viewed 391 times
NickT
 
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Re: Quick alternative for setting Z-Zero after tool change

Postby cgallery » Sat Apr 15, 2017 4:51 pm

Very clever and accurate enough for my typical needs. I'll be stealing this.
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Re: Quick alternative for setting Z-Zero after tool change

Postby NickT » Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:23 pm

Other fairly obvious ways of doing this is a similar fashion to using bits with collars.

You could mark your bits with a line..sharpie, tape, paint.. pick you method. As long as the length from the tip of the bit to this line is constant across all your bits then you can also have a fairly accurate method to swap bits and maintain z-zero. Just insert the bit up to the line and tighten it down.. Again, not super accurate, but for general use it should be fine.

Just some other thoughts on this..

Enjoy!
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